Think Info

Exploring the information space

On third-party transclusion

On 25 August 2014, Sorin Pintilie (@sorpeen, http://www.sorpin.com/) published an article on The Pastry Box Project, discussing a mechanism that would allow content to be transcluded into a web page, by applying an href="…" attribute to a <p> tag. This article is a response to that.

Transclusion is the inclusion of a small element of content from one source into other material, by reference. The transcluded content is presented as an integral part of the final material – at the point of reference – while remaining dependent on its primary source. It is included at presentation time. The principle of transclusion was part of the original description of hypertext, as published by Ted Nelson in 1965.

There are two variants to transclusion. The first, as envisaged by Nelson, is the easier: content reuse within a single publishing environment. Sorin’s article, and this one, deal with the second type: including a snippet of someone else’s content into your publishing. Read more of this post

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Semantic long-form

Long form: it’s been the basis of communication for millennia. We tell stories; we’ve been successfully sharing concepts with others this way for as long as we’ve been recording history – indeed, long-form communications is perhaps the fundamental enabler of the very concept of history.

Why, then, do we have such trouble migrating this most basic form of communication to the digital realm? What about how we create, manage, maintain and distribute long-form content makes it machine-unreadable?

Personally, I blame Xerox.

Space Diner, by Chris Shipton Read more of this post

Bridging Content

A short while ago, I attended a Content Strategy event: nine people each gave a five minute talk – an intense format that can throw up some real gems. On this occasion, the gem came from Chris Atherton (@finiteattention), and is a concept I can only describe as the principle of Bridging Content.

You can lead a horse to water…

The background to Chris’ presentation: design agency Numiko was selected by the UK government’s Time to Change initiative to build a digital engagement strategy aimed at younger people. Considerable research was done with the target audience: both with and without direct exposure to mental illness and its impact. According to Chris, this resulted in thirteen – yes, 13 – personae. Read more of this post

What does your CMS actually do?

You’ve shelled out the money – six figures very likely. You have the license. The wonderful CMS they sold you is yours to use. So, what are you going to do?

In other terms

I am no musician. My fingers do not obey my instructions when it comes to evoking the melody. But, I wanted to learn. The piano is supposed to be a fairly basic instrument; maybe not the easiest, but the notes are all laid out in front of one is a fairly obvious way.

I went into a music store and asked a salesman which piano I should buy. I was honest about not having a clue; not knowing how to play. But I have a good ear for sound. I know if I like the tone of something. All smiles, he took me to one special piano he had; I closed my eyes and listened while he played. The piece was hauntingly beautiful – a minute and a half of lively bounce. Chopin, he told me; Étude Op. 10 n. 5. A piece that demonstrated no lack of skill.

Sold. I handed over my money and awaited delivery.

Maestro
Was I ever in for a shock? A week later, the very piano the salesman had played me that demo piece on arrived and was set up in my living room. I lifted the lid to see what my new toy sounded like in my home – and discovered that half the keys were missing! On the right half of the keyboard, there was only the single white key; an F. Read more of this post

A side order of biscuits

This site does not use cookies. It is, however, served with them.

UK law now required that you, as a user of this site, be notified that there are small pieces of data distributed with the pages of this site, that can track you. And you must be presented with the opportunity to opt in to receiving them. If you don’t want them, skip to the instructions at the end.
your order of cookies

What’s a cookie?

Cookies are small elements of information – an identifier and a value. In themselves, they are gibberish. It is what is done with them is potentially problematic. Web site owners like to build up profiles of their visitors, to better serve them. During a single visit, there are many ways to do this. Placing a cookie on your machine allows a site to identify you across visits. Read more of this post

The content testing ground

At CS Applied last month, Rahel Bailie held a workshop where she explained the work she has been doing on the City of Vancouver’s web site. She outlined a triage approach to content auditing: what to keep, what to discard, and what needed reworking.

The model is beautifully simple. And if done right – with sign-off from the powers – it provides a perfect tool with which to test new content people come up with. Anything that fails the test would not have survived the original triage, so should not make it onto the site.

The four levels of the value proposition

Content Heaven Gatekeeper

Goals

What is the goal of your site? What are its goals? This is described in lofty terms; it is board-speak. It may be to sell more product, to service a community or to provide thought leadership. This is the answer to the Why of your site’s existence. It is not interested in implementation or approach; it cares only for concepts. Read more of this post